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Weobley High – Design and Technology

Subject leader for Design & Technology: Mrs Juliard

Teaching staff: Mr Mills

Technicians: Miss Wood, Mr Waring

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Welcome to the Weobley High School’s Design and Technology Department.

This is a subject for all pupils, irrespective of ability and gender. It has the central aim of giving the children of the school an opportunity to construct, create and invent. Lessons take place in the ground floor workshop area and on the top floor food and textiles suites.

Learning activities are essentially practical with either the making or acquisition of technical skills being the main focus or as in several tasks, where pupils are encouraged to design and make their own solutions to practical problems.

The time allocation for key stage three is based on two one hour lessons each week with classes being no larger than 22 pupils.

The national curriculum for Design and Technology is delivered by specialist teachers providing lessons in each of the five main subjects: food; textiles; resistant materials; graphics; systems and control.

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The accommodation consists of a suite of rooms for food and textiles, a multi-material machine workshop and a CAD/CAM classroom.

Throughout Key Stage 3, each week every pupil attends a lesson centred on resistant materials/graphics/systems & control and a lesson in food or textiles.

In Resistant Materials and Graphics, topics covered include:

  • Materials
  • Electronics
  • Design
  • CAD/CAM
  • Graphics
  • Packaging
  • Structures
  • Model Making
  • Mechanisms

In Food, topics covered include:

  • Healthy Eating
  • Nutrition
  • Food Provenance
  • Food Hygiene
  • Practical Cookery Skills
  • Meal Planning
  • Sensory Analysis

In Textiles, topics covered include:

  • Health and Safety
  • Equipment and Tools
  • CAD/CAM
  • Fibres and Fabrics
  • Creative Textiles
  • Construction Techniques
Subject Title
DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY
Qualification GCSE
Exam Board/Syllabus EDEXCEL
Levels of Entry One tier of assessment covering grades 9 – 1
Final Assessment Component 1
Written examination: 1 hour and 45 minutes 50% of the qualification (100 marks)

The paper consists of two sections. Section A is assessed on the core content and Section B is assessed on the material category students have chosen.

Component 2
Non-examined assessment 50% of the qualification (100 marks)

Students will undertake a project based on a contextual challenge released by Edexcel a year before certification.Brief Syllabus DetailsThe GCSE in Design and Technology enables students to understand and apply iterative design processes through which they explore, create and evaluate a range of outcomes. The qualification enables students to use creativity and imagination to design and make prototypes that solve real and relevant problems, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values.What will I do in lessons?Pupils realise focused practical tasks in order to develop their own personal skills and knowledge, leading to their own design and manufacture of the practical task. Written theoretical work is undertaken to support practical and design concepts.HomeworkHomework is set as an extension of the topics studied in class. In addition, it is vital element of the organisation of the practical element of class work and the non-examination assessment task. Homework is also essential for effective examination preparation and revision.Ongoing assessmentRegular dialogue and feedback will be provided throughout the course, informing students of their current attainment and targets for improvement.DifferentiationGCSE Design and Technology is taught in mixed ability groups. Generally, all candidates attempt the same mini-project work in year 10; however, support or extension work is always available. The non-examination assessment task and final written examination are set by the examination board with performance criteria covering grades 9 – 1.Extra-curricularFacilities are available by prior appointment with subject teacher for students to receive additional guidance, discuss their work, complete homework, organise assessment task or to prepare for the written examination.Qualities for successAn interest in problem-solving and creativity are a must. An ability to gather research independently is essential in order to prepare students for lessons.
Good organisational skills are necessary in order to meet the requirement of the course.
Students are required to apply knowledge from other disciplines, including mathematics, science, art and design, computing and humanities.
In addition, a willingness to work hard in all aspects of the subject, accept advice and strive for personal development.Beyond GCSE

Students can progress from this qualification to:

  • GCEs, e.g. GCE A Level or AS in Design and Technology
  • Level 3 vocational qualifications, e.g. the BTEC Level 3 qualifications in Engineering
  • Employment, e.g. in a design- or technology-based industry where an Apprenticeship may be available.

Popular careers for people with design and technology qualifications include: product designer, architect, software engineer, civil engineer and carpenter.

 

Weobley High – Resistant Materials

Galley of Key Stage 3

Subject Title
DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY: RESISTANT MATERIALS
Qualification GCSE
Exam Board/Syllabus AQA Specification 4562
Levels of Entry One tier of assessment covering grades A* – G
Final Assessment Final grade determined by examination and 60% assessment task.

A 3D product/folder of design

Written examination 40% completed in 2 hours

Brief Syllabus Details Candidates will use wood, metal and plastics to realise design problems resulting in the manufacture of a final quality product.
What will I do in lessons? Pupils realise focused practical tasks in order to develop their own personal skills and knowledge, leading to their own design and manufacture of the practical task. Written theoretical work is undertaken to support practical and design concepts.
Homework Homework will be set on a regular basis to support theory lessons or the production of design folders.
Ongoing assessment Assessment will take the form of the marking of homework, and applying examination scoring to practical tasks.
Differentiation This subject enables pupils to design and make their own projects using resistant materials – differentiation is achieved by criteria.
Extra-curricular Facilities are available during pre-arranged routine time and after school extra lesson.
Qualities for success · Skilled and precise use of wood, metal and plastics

Practical application of knowledge/terminology

Beyond GCSE · A level course at VI Form College

Foundation courses at Hereford College of Art & Design

Weobley High – Food
Gallery of Key Stage 3 Meals

Examples of GCSE Work

 

At KS4, Year 10 and 11 study EDUQAS GCSE Food, Preparation and Nutrition.

This new specification is a very exciting development in Food education and allows students of all abilities to excel.

Subject Title
FOOD PREPARATION AND NUTRITION
Qualification GCSE
Exam Board EDUQAS
Levels of Entry One tier of assessment covering grades 9 – 1
Final Assessment The final grade is determined by two non-examination assessment tasks and one written examination.

The non-examination assessment tasks are set by the examination board and account for 50% of the final grade. Both of the non-examination assessment tasks will be completed in year 11.

Task 1 is a food investigation which accounts for 15% and will be completed in September and October. This task will assess students understanding of the scientific principles of food.

Task 2 is a food preparation and nutrition assessment which accounts for 35% and will be completed from November through to March. This task requires students to plan, prepare, cook and present a menu and includes a three-hour practical assessment.

The final written examination makes up the remaining 50%.

Brief Specification Details The specification concentrates on food preparation and nutrition and will equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating.

The specification has been designed to allow innovative teaching to create a balance between practical work and theoretical knowledge and understanding. The specification covers the following topics:

  • Food commodities
  • Food provenance and sustainability
  • The science of food
  • Principles of nutrition
  • Diet and good health
  • Planning meals

· Cooking and food preparation

What will I do in lessons? Practical work is an essential part of the course and it is anticipated that this will be carried out on a regular weekly basis.

The specification will be covered in year 10 through mini-projects and in addition to practical work will also include planning and theory lessons.

In Year 11 pupils will be complete non -examination assessments and prepare for the final examination.

Homework Homework is set as an extension of the topics studied in class. In addition, it is vital element of the organisation of the practical element of class work and the non-examination assessment tasks. Homework is also essential for effective examination preparation and revision.
Ongoing assessment Regular dialogue and feedback will be provided throughout the course, informing students of their current attainment and targets for improvement.
Differentiation Food Preparation and Nutrition is taught in mixed ability groups. Generally, all candidates attempt the same mini-project work in year 10; however, support or extension work is always available. In Year 11 the non-examination assessment tasks and final written examination are set by the examination board with performance criteria covering grades 9 – 1.
Extra-curricular Facilities are available after school on a specified day each week for students to receive additional guidance, discuss their work, complete homework, organise assessment tasks or to prepare for the written examination.
Qualities for success Students require an interest in the subject and a keenness to develop their practical food skills i.e. food preparation, cooking, presentation and a willingness to develop and apply their understanding and knowledge of food commodities, food choice and healthy eating.

Students must also be keen to develop and apply knowledge related to the scientific principles of ingredients, cooking and nutrition.

Good organisational skills are necessary in order to meet the requirement of regular practical work and the controlled practical assessment tasks.

In addition, a willingness to work hard in all aspects of the subject, accept advice and strive for personal development.

Beyond GCSE Studying Food Preparation and Nutrition can lead to exciting and well paid career options. Consumers are becoming increasingly reliant on the food industry to develop solutions for their nutritional needs. This course could lead to related study at level 3 and further study at undergraduate and post graduate level. Careers are varied and could lead into roles such as Food Product Developer, Food Buyer (travelling the world sourcing new food products for manufacturers or retailers), Nutritionist, Dietician, Food Scientist, Microbiologist, Food inspector, Environmental Health Officer, Food Technologist, Food photographer, working for magazines or TV as a Food Stylist or Home Economist, careers in hospitality and catering e.g. Chef, Hotel Manager or Restaurant manager. For more information on food careers visit www.http://tastycareers.org.uk

 

Weobley High – Textiles
Gallery of Key Stage 3

 

Weobley High – Construction

 

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Subject Title
Constructing the Built Environment- Unit Scheme Award
Qualification Level 1 or Level 2 Award
Exam Board AQA
Levels of Entry Level 1 or 2 – both units being measured as 120 guided hours
Final Assessment There is no final exam or assessment. Pupils have to complete 3 units of work which are internally assessed and then externally checked and moderated.

 

The range of awards and GCSE equivalent are as follows:

Level 2 Pass = GCSE grade C

Level 1 Pass = GCSE grade D-G

Level 2 Merit = GCSE grade B

Level 2 Distinction = GCSE A

Level 2 Distinction* = GCSE A*

Brief Syllabus Details The course has THREE areas of assessment:

 

· Safety and Security in Construction

· Practical Construction Skills (brick-laying, carpentry & roofing)

· Planning Construction Projects

 

The aims of the course are for learners to:

a) Develop a range of skills, both practical and academic, through applied learning that will be useful in the workplace and for future learning

b) Provide a foundation of knowledge about the construction industry that will help learners to further study or enter the industry

c) Motivate learners through purposeful tasks set in a construction environment.

 

The award has been designed around the concept of ‘plan, do and review’. This mirrors many work-related activities in the construction industry and allow learning to take place in a range of contexts.

 

The course is taught by a member of staff who is self-employed in the building industry and has many years of experience to share with the pupils.

During the summer term Year 8 pupils visit a site of technological interest. The most recent visit was to Normandy, when pupils experience much of this French region with a combined subject trip including History and Modern Languages.

Similar UK residential visits have also been made to North Wales, Bristol, Liverpool and Portsmouth.

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Intent

The Design and Technology department at Weobley is committed to providing all pupils with a high-quality curriculum which inspires them to become self-motivated and confident learners. We aim to instil a love of learning in all of our pupils, across all Technology areas.

Design and Technology develops a pupil’s ability to solve design problems in a rational and organised way by broadening their knowledge of materials and techniques, leaving plenty of scope for imaginative and creative flair. Our mission is to provide a coherent and sequential curriculum that builds confidence and encourages pupils to embrace an ever-changing technological world.

Our curriculum has been designed to give all students the opportunity to learn the skills and knowledge to engage positively with materials, components, products, and technologies in the world around them. We aim to teach pupils to be imaginative and adaptable, to make significant progress in their achievements, and to use technology appropriately and safely.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”Implementation” tab_id=”1648041657654-718d4941-b2c1″][vc_column_text]

Implementation

The DT curriculum is collaboratively and coherently planned and sequenced across Years 7- 9/GCSE to ensure that pupils build on all aspects of prior learning and it also stretches and challenges all pupils regardless of life experiences or starting points. The schemes of work have been mapped against the National Curriculum and the Design and Technology Association (DATA) Progression Framework to ensure that all of the skills are embedded into the curriculum.

At Key Stage 3, all pupils study Design and Technology for two hours each week. In years 7 and 8, Textiles is taught on a half-yearly rotation with Cooking and Nutrition. In Year 9, all pupils study Cooking and Nutrition for the full academic year. Resistant Materials/Graphics/Systems & Control are studied during Design and Technology lessons at Key Stage 3. All of our Design and Technology lessons at Weobley are taught by subject specialist teachers and classes are no larger than 23 pupils.

Continued investment has resulted in modern workspaces equipped with the latest technology for design and manufacture. Cooking and Nutrition is taught in a spacious, well-equipped food room. The adjacent textiles room is equipped with Janome sewing machines and a wide variety of fabrics and embellishments for design and make projects. The Design and Technology workshop provides pupils with access to a wide range of hand tools and machinery. In addition, students are encouraged to embrace CAD-CAM, including graphic design (Google Sketchup), laser technology and 3D Printing.

In Cooking and Nutrition, Years 7, 8 and 9 follow a course based around the National Curriculum which encourages them to understand and apply the fundamental principles of nutrition and healthy eating. The students are required to cook a wide range of predominantly savoury dishes, with the level of challenge increasing each academic year.

In Textiles, Graphics, Resistant Materials and Systems and Control, all schemes of work include the following core competences: Designing, Making, Evaluating and Technical Knowledge. The pupils are given the opportunity to develop their practical expertise through a range of engaging projects.

Key Stage 4

At Key Stage 4, pupils are given the option to Study GCSE Design and Technology or GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition. In Year 10, pupils will have 2 hours per week and in Year 11, this increases to 3 hours (consisting of one double and one single lesson).  Each term the pupils are introduced to a new topic of study, though some fundamental facts do remain the same and are revisited in order to reinforce understanding.

GCSE Design Technology: Pupils follow the Edexcel Design and Technology specification, which enables them to understand and apply iterative design processes through which they explore, create and evaluate a range of outcomes. Pupils use creativity and imagination to design and make their prototypes. Pupils are encouraged to take design risks, helping them to become resourceful, innovative and enterprising citizens.

GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition: Pupils follow the Eduqas GCSE specifications in Food Preparation and Nutrition which equips students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating. In Year 10, the pupils cover a majority of the syllabus, as both Non-Examination Assessments (NEA) are completed in Year 11. They have the opportunity to develop their cooking skills by cooking on a weekly basis.

Extra-Curricular

The Design and Technology Department is keen to enhance our pupils’ learning experience and offer ‘Catch up Club’ daily in the Workshop or Food Room and Cooking Club after school on a Thursday (3:30-4:45pm). We aim to provide a positive experience at Weobley and encourage students to enjoy some creative time! Department displays and schemes of work also promote possible career opportunities for any pupils considering future employment in the technological world.[/vc_column_text][/vc_tta_section][vc_tta_section title=”Impact” tab_id=”1648041690458-e91d255f-9694″][vc_column_text]

Impact

At Weobley High School the impact of the Design and Technology Curriculum will be such that:

  • Pupils will have a positive experience of DT and engage with their learning in lessons. This will be reflected in the number of students opting for GCSE Food Preparation and Nutrition and GCSE Design Technology.
  • Pupils will leave school with the practical expertise needed to perform everyday tasks confidently and to participate successfully in an increasingly technological world.
  • Pupils will have acquired the skills needed to cook a repertoire of predominantly savoury dishes so that they are able to feed themselves, and others, a healthy and varied diet.
  • Pupils will feel prepared for the next transition into education or employment and will have confidence in the subject, having embedded, developed and applied knowledge and skills learned from Key Stage 3 to Key Stage 4.

We assess this impact by the regular monitoring of our teaching and the assessment of pupils’ learning and understanding. Assessments may happen in a range of ways, such as through assessing practical work, questioning, end of term assessments, and self- or peer-assessment. Teachers are clear about the assessment criteria, which both helps pupils to improve their attainment and motivates them. Assessments are designed so that teachers can identify specific gaps in pupils’ knowledge and any potential misconceptions.

In Design and Technology, we measure the impact of our curriculum in a variety of ways including:

  • Learning walks/lesson observations and professional dialogue with teachers
  • Book Monitoring
  • Pupil engagement and teacher feedback
  • Pupil Questionnaires
  • Improved subject vocabulary
  • Pupil and teacher progress tracking (including learning journeys).
  • Attainment and achievement outcomes
  • Attendance and behaviour data

 

Curriculum Overview: Design and Technology

Key Stage 3 (Years 7, 8 and 9)

Year 7- Students are taught in mixed ability year groups and they will have two hours of Design and Technology per week for the whole year.

One hour: Cooking & Nutrition/Textiles

One hour: Graphics/Resistant Materials/Systems & Control

Graphics- Drawing Skills, Money Saving Box Project,

Resistant Materials- Ball Bearing Game Project.

Systems & Control- Bridge Project

Cooking & Nutrition- Basic Skills, Food Safety, Basic Nutrition, Food Provenance

(Dishes: Fruit Salad, French Bread Pizza, Fruit Crumble, Chicken Goujons, Muffins and Vegetable Spring Rolls)

Textiles- Emoji Keyring and Animal Doorstop

Year 8- Students are taught in mixed ability year groups and they will have two hours of Design and Technology per week for the whole year.

One hour: Cooking & Nutrition/Textiles

One hour: Graphics/Resistant Materials

Graphics- Communication Skills, Chocolate Bar Project,

Resistant Materials- Wooden Box and Acrylic Jewellery Projects.

Cooking & Nutrition- Eatwell Guide, 8 Tips For Healthy Eating, Food Provenance

(Dishes: Eatwell Salad in a Jar, Pizza (dough base), Healthy ‘Pot Noodle’, Scones or Open Fruit Pie, Cheese Straws, Spaghetti Bolognese, Bread Rolls)

Textiles- Mobile Phone Case and Applique Cushion

Year 9- Students are taught in mixed ability year groups and they will have two hours of Design and Technology per week for the whole year.

One hour: Cooking & Nutrition

One hour: Graphics/Resistant Materials/Systems & Control

Graphics- Designing a New School (Google Sketchup CAD)

Resistant Materials- Bird House Project

Systems & Control- Bottle Opener Project

Cooking & Nutrition- Food Poisoning, Functions of Ingredients, Special Dietary Requirements, Factors Affecting Food Choice.

(Dishes: Lasagne, Cheesecake, Stir-Fry, Sausage/Vegetarian Plait, Sweet and Sour Chicken, Chicken au gratin, Savoury Minced Beef Pie, Dutch Apple Cake, Food Waste Practical, Chocolate Torte Food Styling Activity)

 

Key Stage 4 (Years 10 & 11)

Year 10- Students will have two hours per week for their chosen option.

Year 11- Students will have three hours per week for their chosen option.

 

Subject Title DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY
Qualification GCSE
Exam Board/Syllabus EDEXCEL
Levels of Entry One tier of assessment covering grades 9 – 1
Final Assessment Component 1

Written examination: 1 hour and 45 minutes 50% of the qualification (100 marks)

 

The paper consists of two sections. Section A is assessed on the core content and Section B is assessed on the material category students have chosen.

 

Component 2

Non-examined assessment 50% of the qualification (100 marks)

 

Students will undertake a project based on a contextual challenge released by Edexcel a year before certification.

 

Brief Syllabus details The GCSE in Design and Technology enables students to understand and apply iterative design processes through which they explore, create and evaluate a range of outcomes. The qualification enables students to use creativity and imagination to design and make prototypes that solve real and relevant problems, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values.
What will I do in lessons? Pupils realise focused practical tasks in order to develop their own personal skills and knowledge, leading to their own design and manufacture of the practical task. Written theoretical work is undertaken to support practical and design concepts.
Homework Homework is set as an extension of the topics studied in class. In addition, it is vital element of the organisation of the practical element of class work and the non-examination assessment task. Homework is also essential for effective examination preparation and revision.
Ongoing Assessment Regular dialogue and feedback will be provided throughout the course, informing students of their current attainment and targets for improvement.
Differentiation GCSE Design and Technology is taught in mixed ability groups.  Generally, all candidates attempt the same mini-project work in year 10; however, support or extension work is always available. The non-examination assessment task and final written examination are set by the examination board with performance criteria covering grades 9 – 1.
Extra-Curricular Facilities are available by prior appointment with subject teacher for students to receive additional guidance, discuss their work, complete homework, organise assessment task or to prepare for the written examination
Qualities for Success An interest in problem-solving and creativity are a must. An ability to gather research independently is essential in order to prepare students for lessons.

 

Good organisational skills are necessary in order to meet the requirement of the course.

 

Students are required to apply knowledge from other disciplines, including mathematics, science, art and design, computing and humanities.

 

In addition, a willingness to work hard in all aspects of the subject, accept advice and strive for personal development

Beyond GCSE Students can progress from this qualification to:

§  GCEs, e.g. GCE A Level or AS in Design and Technology

§   Level 3 vocational qualifications, e.g. the BTEC Level 3 qualifications in Engineering

§  Employment, e.g. in a design- or technology-based industry where an Apprenticeship may be available.

 

Popular careers for people with design and technology qualifications include: product designer, architect, software engineer, civil engineer and carpenter.

 

Subject Title FOOD PREPARATION AND NUTRITION
Qualification GCSE
Exam Board EDUQAS
Levels of Entry One tier of assessment covering grades 9 – 1
Final Assessment
 

 

 

 

 

 

Final Assessment

The final grade is determined by two non-examination assessment tasks and one written examination.

The non-examination assessment tasks are set by the examination board and account for 50% of the final grade. Both of the non-examination assessment tasks will be completed in year 11.

Task 1 is a food investigation which accounts for 15% and will be completed in September and October.  This task will assess students understanding of the scientific principles of food.

Task 2 is a food preparation and nutrition assessment which accounts for 35% and will be completed from November through to March. This task requires students to plan, prepare, cook and present a menu and includes a three-hour practical assessment.

The final written examination makes up the remaining 50%.

Brief Specification Details The specification concentrates on food preparation and nutrition and will equip students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to cook and apply the principles of food science, nutrition and healthy eating.

The specification has been designed to allow innovative teaching to create a balance between practical work and theoretical knowledge and understanding.  The specification covers the following topics:

·  Food commodities

·  Food provenance and sustainability

·  The science of food

·  Principles of nutrition

·  Diet and good health

·  Planning meals

·  Cooking and food preparation

What will I do in lessons? Practical work is an essential part of the course and it is anticipated that this will be carried out on a regular weekly basis.

The specification will be covered in year 10 through mini-projects and in addition to practical work will also include planning and theory lessons.

In Year 11 pupils will be complete non -examination assessments and prepare for the final examination.

Homework Homework is set as an extension of the topics studied in class. In addition, it is vital element of the organisation of the practical element of class work and the non-examination assessment tasks. Homework is also essential for effective examination preparation and revision.
Ongoing assessment Regular dialogue and feedback will be provided throughout the course, informing students of their current attainment and targets for improvement.
Differentiation Food Preparation and Nutrition is taught in mixed ability groups.  Generally, all candidates attempt the same mini-project work in year 10; however, support or extension work is always available. In Year 11 the non-examination assessment tasks and final written examination are set by the examination board with performance criteria covering grades 9 – 1.
Extra-curricular Facilities are available after school on a specified day each week for students to receive additional guidance, discuss their work, complete homework, organise assessment tasks or to prepare for the written examination.
Qualities for success Students require an interest in the subject and a keenness to develop their practical food skills i.e. food preparation, cooking, presentation and a willingness to develop and apply their understanding and knowledge of food commodities, food choice and healthy eating.

Students must also be keen to develop and apply knowledge related to the scientific principles of ingredients, cooking and nutrition.

Good organisational skills are necessary in order to meet the requirement of regular practical work and the controlled practical assessment tasks.

In addition, a willingness to work hard in all aspects of the subject, accept advice and strive for personal development.

Beyond GCSE Studying Food Preparation and Nutrition can lead to exciting and well-paid career options. Consumers are becoming increasingly reliant on the food industry to develop solutions for their nutritional needs. This course could lead to related study at level 3 and further study at undergraduate and post graduate level. Careers are varied and could lead into roles such as Food Product Developer, Food Buyer (travelling the world sourcing new food products for manufacturers or retailers), Nutritionist, Dietician, Food Scientist, Microbiologist, Food inspector, Environmental Health Officer, Food Technologist, Food photographer, working for magazines or TV as a Food Stylist or Home Economist, careers in hospitality and catering e.g. Chef, Hotel Manager or Restaurant manager. For more information on food careers visit www.http://tastycareers.org.uk

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